pretty as a picture

Posted by: Sarah Trost in Aspies, autism/asperger's, Being Mommy, Family No Comments »

My girls always make the funniest faces (unintentionally) in their
photographs. I’ve tried having them practice in front of a mirror and it just
doesn’t work. So now this is what I do:

I tell them to close their eyes. When their face looks calm and relaxed I tell
them to think of (an ice cream sunday, their favorite video game, whatever you
can think of that will bring a smile to their faces.) When I see that natural
smile I get ready to snap the picture and then I tell them to open their eyes.
Perfect picture almost every time!

an aspie son interviews mom

Posted by: Sarah Trost in Aspies, autism/asperger's, Being Mommy, Family, Homeschooling No Comments »

why it’s not the same thing

Posted by: Sarah Trost in autism/asperger's, Family, health, Today in the News No Comments »

A good friend of mine suggested that it’s a good thing for AS/ASD to be not so widely diagnosed because the extremely wide spread diagnosis of ADD/ADHD and other disorders and over medication has become an overwhelming concern and problem to many (I have read that most children in foster care are taking at least three psychiatric medications for PRIMARILY ADD.)

I completely agree that this is a problem that needs to be addressed and a solution found. However, AS/ASD is more likely to be under-diagnosed, and typically unmediated. Here is the reply I sent to her.

AS and ASD have no common medications prescribed because there is nothing recommended specifically for AS/ASD. Children and adults on the autism spectrum may be given something for anxiety, OCD, PTSD, insomnia, ect but those are independent of the autism diagnosis, considered to be comorbid syndromes. Medical insurance does not typically pay for anything related to AS/ASD such as speech therapy, occupational therapy, or behavioral therapy because it’s not considered a curable disorder. However, with a diagnosis, children and adults may qualify for special services through the schools and colleges (such as speech and OT, ABA or other therapies) and accommodations (like a quiet place to test with extra time, a special aid, ect.) They may also qualify for Medicaid and SSI, which helps the parents as well as the children with therapies and medical bills. Most on the spectrum are unable to support themselves, so SSI is very helpful for that. ASDs come with all kinds of health issues as it is strongly linked to auto immune disorders. The body begins to attack itself. Candida, food sensitivities ect can be very costly. As it is a neurological disorder, epilepsy and other disorders may also affect the person. A child or adult with autism who gets SSI will get also Medicaid. There’s also respite care for parents to get a babysitter to help care for their child with special needs while they get a much needed break.

There are DAN! doctors (Defeat Autism Now) who understand nutrition and all the ins and outs of ASDs and while there aren’t very many of them, there are a lot of people helped by them. Early intervention and nutritional help ect is out there for those who get a diagnosis. Also, without a diagnosis those on the autism spectrum are very badly treated because they are just ‘difficult’ or ‘morons’ or ‘lazy’ instead of people with a disability who may need extra help. Imagine if a child is never diagnosed as deaf. What would his parents think of him? How would others around him treat him? How would he feel? He would certainly never be taught sign language, so he would be unable to express himself. It also leaves parents helpless to know what to do with their child. In the course of ASDs, a diagnosis is definitely very helpful. In fact, if we didn’t know that Kailey and I have AS our lives would be much worse now. I wouldn’t even have them on a gluten free diet and it’s very possible that Bethany and Taryn wouldn’t be talking. I may have continued vaccinating Kaitlyn, and who knows what she would be like now. But with the new diagnostic criteria, I don’t think we’d be diagnosed. We don’t actually have the official diagnoses as although we could have received it easily enough I chose not to because I thought that could come later if need be. Now, with the new diagnostic criteria, that might not be possible.

An excellent blog on a child with AS that was not diagnosed until later is here (if you can view it through mamapedia, if not let me know and I can copy it.) http://www.mamapedia.com/voices/bright-child-with-asperger-tick-s I’m sure there are plenty of responses of similar stories there.